Does parathyroid cause hair loss?

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asked Aug 9 in Hair by ibabdad (1,460 points)
Does parathyroid cause hair loss?

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answered Aug 26 by layla (53,300 points)
Parathyroid does sometimes cause hair loss in some people although hair loss in people who have parathyroid is only a small percentage.

With hyperparathyroidism, suspected hair growth abnormalities are rarely reported.

There are single studies that show a significant prevalence of hair loss in people with hypoparathyroidism.

Common parathyroid disease symptoms include.

A lump in the neck.
Difficulty speaking or swallowing.
Muscle weakness.
Sudden increase in blood calcium levels (hypercalcemia)
Fatigue, drowsiness.
Urinating more than usual, which may cause you to be dehydrated and very thirsty.
Bone pain and broken bones.
Kidney stones.

The 3 types of hyperparathyroidism are primary, secondary, and tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

Itching is a symptom of hyperparathyroidism.

Other symptoms of hyperparathyroidism besides itching include kidney stones, pancreatitis, bone mineral loss, decreased kidney function, duodenal ulcer, and muscle weakness.

You can sometimes treat a parathyroid condition without surgery through treatments with the medicine cinacalcet.

A promising and an effective non surgical alternative for managing parathyroid adenomas, postoperative recurrent adenoma and treating high PTH, especially in patients who are not eligible for parathyroid surgery.

It benefits these patients who need non surgical parathyroid adenoma treatment.

A parathyroid operation takes on average of 30 minutes to an hour although in some cases parathyroid surgery may take as long as 2 to 3 hours.

Parathyroid surgery is a serious surgery although it's also very safe as well and minimally invasive.

To perform parathyroid surgery the surgeon makes a four-centimeter incision into a neck muscle to access your glands.

If parathyroid disease goes untreated it can lead to life threatening conditions and conditions such as osteoporosis, kidney stones, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, and kidney failure.

If hyperparathyroidism is not treated, it can lead to high blood calcium levels (hypercalcaemia), which may cause: being sick (vomiting) drowsiness. dehydration.

In very severe cases of hyperparathyroidism, high calcium levels can lead to rapid kidney failure, loss of consciousness, coma, or serious life-threatening heart rhythm abnormalities.

But hyperparathyroidism is usually diagnosed at an early stage, and these complications are extremely rare.

Parathyroid disease is diagnosed through blood tests and imaging tests such as MRI and CT scans.

Hyperparathyroidism does sometimes cause leg cramps as well as cramps in the face, stomach and muscle cramps.

The point at which parathyroid surgery is recommended is when your calcium blood levels are greater than 1mg/dl higher than the upper limit of normal; if a person has osteoporosis, kidney stones or kidney dysfunction; or if the person is younger than 50.

Long term symptoms of parathyroid include movement disorders, confusion and forgetfulness, blurry vision, and changes to the bones, teeth, skin, hair, and/or nails.

Hypoparathyroidism is treated with oral or IV medications to increase calcium levels in the blood.

Parathyroid can cause neck pain and neck discomfort.

Parathyroid disease can cause itching as well as other symptoms such as kidney stones, pancreatitis, bone mineral loss, decreased kidney function, duodenal ulcer, and muscle weakness.

The best treatment for parathyroid disease is taking medications, dietary changes and even surgery.

Surgery and medications are the most common treatments for parathyroid disease.

The surgeon will remove only the glands that are enlarged or have a tumor.

If parathyroid disease goes untreated it can lead to other health issues which include osteoporosis, kidney stones, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, and kidney failure.

A high parathyroid level is anything over 65 picograms per milliliter (pg/mL).

The normal range for parathyroid levels is 15 to 65 picograms per milliliter (pg/mL).

Foods you should avoid when you have hypercalcemia are eggs, foods high in calcium and dairy foods (such as cheese, milk, yogurt, ice cream.

Hypercalcemia is most commonly caused by overactive parathyroid glands although hypercalcemia can be caused by other health issues such as cancer, certain other medical disorders, some medications, and taking too much of calcium and vitamin D supplements.

The first treatment of choice for hypercalcemia is Intravenous bisphosphonates.

Bisphosphonates are considered the drugs of choice due to their long-term management.

Calcitonin is preferable in the short-term control of severe hypercalcemia.

The antireabsorptive action of bisphosphonates has been considered the most effective in the disorders characterized by an excessive bone resorption.

The most common treatment for hypercalcemia is a medication called Pamidronate.

Pamidronate is given by IV infusion over 4 to 24 hours.

The initial dose varies: 30 mg if the calcium level is lower than 12 mg/dL, 60 mg if the calcium level is 12 to 13.5 mg/dL, and 90 mg if the calcium level is above that level.

You can fix hypercalcemia through several different ways which include.

Calcitonin (Miacalcin). This hormone from salmon controls calcium levels in the blood.
Calcimimetics. This type of drug can help control overactive parathyroid glands.
Bisphosphonates.
Denosumab (Prolia, Xgeva).
Prednisone.
IV fluids and diuretics.

Intravenous bisphosphonates are the treatment of first choice for the initial management of hypercalcaemia, followed by continued oral, or repeated intravenous bisphosphonates to prevent relapse.

When you have hypercalcemia you will usually feel things such as stomach upset, nausea, vomiting and constipation.

Moderate high levels of hypercalcemia may produce fatigue or excessive tiredness.

Heart rhythm abnormalities, increased urinary frequency, and kidney stones may also be present.

With higher levels of hypercalcemia, patients may experience muscle twitching, anxiety, depression, personality changes and confusion.

Hypercalcemia is not always life threatening but if left untreated the hypercalcemia can become life threatening.

Hypercalcemia is considered mild if the total serum calcium level is between 10.5 and 12 mg per dL (2.63 and 3 mmol per L).

Levels higher than 14 mg per dL (3.5 mmol per L) can be life threatening.

Most people can live for around a year or 2 with more severe hypercalcemia without treatment and with treatment most people can live a long life and several years with hypercalcemia.

Without treatment for the hypercalcemia a person will usually live for up to a year with the untreated hypercalcemia.

And with treatment a person may live a long time after they have been diagnosed with hypercalcemia.

Hypercalcemia is considered mild if the total serum calcium level is between 10.5 and 12 mg per dL (2.63 and 3 mmol per L).

Levels higher than 14 mg per dL (3.5 mmol per L) can be life threatening.

The first line of treatment for hypercalcemia is Intravenous bisphosphonates which is then followed by continued oral, or repeated intravenous bisphosphonates to prevent relapse.

It is most often recommended that you should take Vitamin D if you have hypercalcemia.

Having enough vitamin D replacement will often correct the hypercalcemia.

Vitamin D supplementation has been proposed as a viable treatment option for PHPT despite concerns of further aggravating hypercalcemia.

3 Preliminary studies indicate that vitamin D replacement in mild PHPT reduces parathyroid levels significantly without exacerbating hypercalcemia.

Foods to avoid if you have hypercalcemia include dairy foods (such as cheese, milk, yogurt, ice cream).

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