What does the lamp of knowledge symbolize?

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asked Dec 11, 2021 in Mythology & Folklore by Felixdekatt (1,080 points)
What does the lamp of knowledge symbolize?

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answered Dec 11, 2021 by Cathy21 (45,190 points)
The lamp of knowledge symbolizes the sacred symbol and knowledge of life.

The lamp symbolizes Life, the LIGHT of divinity, wisdom, intellect, and good works.

The lamp of knowledge (life) was derived from the ancient Egyptian ankh, a tau cross with a loop at the top.

Originally, the ankh was regarded as a sacred symbol of life.

The lamp of knowledge (life) is the official symbol of the nursing profession and of higher education.

The Lamp of Knowledge is a prestigious award given to seniors every year who have achieved a high level of academic excellence, and an academic letter.

The Lamp of Knowledge is a prestigious award given to seniors every year who have achieved a high level of academic excellence, and an academic letter.

Life, the LIGHT of divinity, wisdom, intellect, and good works are all manifestations of the symbolic nature of the lamp.

Lamps can also be a gateway to another plane, as in the story of Aladdin and the genie.

Brings protection against dark demons, and can be the illumination of the spirit.

In the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus says: "Nor do they light a lamp and then put it under a bushel basket; it is set on a lampstand, where it gives light to all in the house.

Just so, your light must shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your heavenly Father."

The oil lamp has a few different meanings depending on religion.

However in Judaism the oil lamp symbolizes light that lights the way for wise and righteous.

Christianity sees the oil lamp as a symbol of life eternal and of Gods wisdom.

The oil lamp is lit when a bishop consecrates the church and it is meant to burn until the Judgment day.

In the Bible, it says to keep your lamps full of oil.

What does this mean? Matthew 25:3 3The foolish ones took their lamps but did not take any oil with them.

The lamp however needs oil to continue to shine: it is the oil used to keep watch for and welcome the Bridegroom, the oil of welcoming.

Ancient Egyptians lit thousands of oil lamps in temples, their homes and public places during the ceremony called Liknokaia in honor of goddess Naiff.

They used oil lamps to illuminate statues of the gods as were the Greeks too.

Romans lit the oil lamps before the prayer to symbol Vesta, goddess of home.

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